Friday, 29 June 2012

You Believe WHAT!?!?

All over the world our lives are shaped by our beliefs. Some believe that there is but one God, others say there are 3. Some believe there are no gods whilst others swear that spiritual forces exist, yet others believe in the theory of the 'Big Bang'. Some believe they are white witches, some choose the way of satanism, whilst others still put it all down to random causality.
 
We label ourselves with all these titles in order to let the world know where we stand, and what we believe.
 
Further still, there are many more religions for want of a better word, that people follow and adhere to.
 
Though we may believe in different things, what we all have in common is that our beliefs control what we do in life. If we behave differently, it is because we believe differently.
 
We set our morals around our beliefs, we set aside certain days and/or times of the week to practice it, we refuse to eat particular foods/drinks because of it, we may dress in a particular style as required by it, we may even choose to marry someone from our own group because of it.
 
We close our ears and shun outsiders who don't think as we do. We mock and ridicule those who dare question our beliefs - innocent as it may be at times. We threaten war due to it, and ultimately we beat our chests in defiance to all, that we have the utmost truth.

OK, so you believe what you believe, whatever that may be. But have you ever asked yourself where this belief came from? Or why do you believe what you believe?
 
Do you believe as your parents did? If so is it really your belief? If not, why not?
 
Or have you had an out of the ordinary, supernatural experience that moved you from believing one thing to another?
 
Do you rely on your reason? If so, how do you account for others, as intelligent as you, who are of a different opinion?
 
Where do beliefs come from? Is it possible to 'invent' a new belief, or can it only come from the inspiration of a 'higher power'?
 
If you claim to have no beliefs, then why do you believe in nothing? Is it even possible to believe in nothing? Isn't to believe in nothing an act of faith?
 
Do you just rely on your gut feeling in the pit of your stomach? What makes your gut so trustworthy?
 
Did you do any type of research into what you believe or do you believe by default, without even questioning?
 
I'm not looking to abuse or challenge what anyone believes, in fact, I don't even need to know what you believe. What I'm trying to get at is how you came to believe it, in the light of the questions above.

55 comments:

  1. I believe in physical reality, in my body and in the body of the world. How did I come to believe in it? Through those five magi: sight, hearing, taste, smell and touch.

    Great post!

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    1. Thanks nothingprofound, and I appreciate your input here.

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  2. I wish I could have a strong belief but I'm just not sure what's happening or why.
    Some thoughts:
    I "try" to believe what my parents believed when they were alive.
    I hope my existence does not end when I die. I'm not afraid to die because if there is only nothingness I won't experience anything. I won't suffer.
    God must be something we can not understand with our limited intelligence.
    Maybe all religions point in God's general direction.

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    1. Thanks John. I think a lot of us don't have a definite answer to many things that happen around us, or really understand why they are happening, so I see what you mean here and many of us do follow what our parents believe but don't question why.

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  3. Hard to explain actually, but when you feel the joy, the life, the inspiration, the goodness, the spirit from a certain belief, you would cling to it. Actually, I don't argue about the beliefs of one another. We have different environments, different experiences, different cultures and yes, different beliefs. But one thing I'd like to keep is to give proper respect to each other's beliefs. We might be different in our beliefs but we can always show respect to each other.

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    1. Thanks for sharing how you see it Ric. Although I too feel that we should no longer argue/fight about other beliefs, I do think it is good to debate/discuss other religions and viewpoints providing it is done in a constructive way. I guess I like to think I respect other religions but at times feel that there is a point where I have to say 'I will not bow down to that', as some religions impose their traditions upon you and expect you to abide by it, when you resist it can look as if you are the one causing problems, so yes I respect to a point where it doesn't interfere with my rights.

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  4. Interesting how the word "claim" can suddenly take all politically correct talk, and wanting to talk about faith right out the window. That one word right there is why atheists hate talking to christians about religion. Because they do not credit that we really do not believe in God, just that we claim not to.

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    1. Jamie
      I accept that atheists do not believe in God but there are also people who claim to have absolutely no beliefs ie: they do not believe in anything, they just live and then die. They don't put themselves into any category (if I can call it that) and would not call themselves atheists, so I was trying to nudge them into saying why they believe in absolutely nothing. By default I pulled you up into the net.

      What I'd be really interested in knowing from you Jamie, purely for my own nosey satisfaction and not to argue with you about any conclusions that you have drawn is ...
      what actually brought you to the point of not believing, that's if you ever did believe in the first place? or did you grow up believing in something different and then become an atheist?

      Mark my words Jamie, I come from a christian background so I know first hand from my own experience how some 'so called' christians have given God/Church a real bad name, and that's putting it mildly.

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    2. My parents are atheist. My mother was born to two people who had lost a child before baptism and told their child would be forever in limbo, a place between heaven and hell, because she was not baptized in her 8 days on Earth. They did a lot of soul searching and decided that the church was bunk and so my mother was raised without belief. My dad was raised by Italian Catholics. I do not know how into religion he was, but similar to my grandparents, he had a brother who damned his immortal soul by committing suicide. My dad is not of a mind that a perfect god could then damn a soul to hell when he knew they were destined to commit suicide due to a bipolar disorder.
      I was never taught to believe in supernatural, period. Because of that I find religion far fetched. I do not think you are less intelligent if you buy into the supernatural, but I do think you compartmentalize fact and faith. I think you make excuses for your faith.
      Now my partner is an atheist (I strongly doubt I could ever be in a relationship with a theist), but his turn about from an extremely fundamentalist group who referred to themselves as a remnant group (considering themselves true to the original disciples). He made his lucky break away through bible study. I think his mind just could not compartmentalize well enough to keep from seeing the gaping holes and flaws in the bible. His is a very angry at religion as a whole, because of his parents and others like them. But,, and i know this is tough for people to grasp, he is not mad at god, because you can not be mad at someone else's imaginary friend.
      Then I have a best friend who literally believes in nothing. In his mind, since not enough evidence is present to prove the existence of *something* out there or not, he doesn;t give s hit one way or the other. He is like an unquestioning agnostic. He was raised by pagan parents. While not raised "in the faith", he and his siblings were raised around it. His sister is a hardcore pagan, he is an unbeliever, and his younger brother seems more towards the Buddhist philosophies (though he is still young yet).
      My own view on faith is that it is yours. When you start to think everyone else's behavior should revolve around your belief, then you have gone to the bad place. You become one of those who give your faith a bad name, regardless of what faith it is.

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    3. Jamie. Very interesting. You're a bit of an observer aren't you, of the things that go on around you? It sounds like not everything you have seen has not been positive. I suppose the important thing when confronted with such a plethora of uses and abuses, is to remain constructively critical without being cynical in order to be able to filter out the bad/toxic yet still recognise the good and wholesome where it is to be found. Thanks for sharing your experiences with us Jamie, a real eye-opener.

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  5. I always love your posts!!! Please visit my blog site---I have something special there for you, and I hope you will participate! Hint hint..it's an award! From: Menopausalmother.blogspot.com

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    1. Menopausal mama
      Yes, I did have a look and would like to say a big 'Thank You' for not only thinking of me but also for reading and taking an interest in my posts for some time now. I must also add that your blog has given me a tremendous laugh such as 'How to annoy your children', 'facebook fossil' and many more.

      For those of you who don't know what I'm talking about then please check this out: at:
      http://menopausalmother.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/how-to-annoy-your-children.html

      Thanks again menopausal mama

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  6. Maybe many aeons ago an accidental electron hit a small cell in the "cultive soup" of the early times in our dreadful planet, or maybe some aeons later an ape decided to get down from the trees and walk upright, or Somebody formed a figurine with the mud on Earth and blow a living breath into it, or maybe there was some other event we did not record about, or that event seems as preposterous that we dismiss it without thinking, as the story about Prometheus creating a man and a woman and ordering them to walk and throw a rock over their shoulders. Those rocks tossed by the man became another man and those tossed by the woman became another woman.

    Anyway the method seems irrelevant for this occasion. What happened was that this being started to "find out", that there was a difference between the environment and "its" own being. This revelation, knowledge, or whatever you want to call it, assailed the being intellect in a way that changed all the past, present and future of humankind.

    Also, this meeting with "otherness" revealed to "its" understanding the infinity that lodged in "its" soul, spirit, mind, or whatever you want to call the centre of awareness that assessed these facts.

    The spectacular rising of the moon over the sea, a magnificent sunrise, or sunset, and the beauty of a flower, was so astonishing that the poor being, knowing "it" was not responsible for those events, asked logically "I did not make this, then, who did it"?

    And so it started...

    One God, two Gods, three Gods, one only God composed by three different Gods, No God at all, an Absolute, a Tao or way, Science, whatever!

    Imagination, mysticism, and personal interest, amalgamated by cultural traits joined forces to create a caste of priests.

    With little exceptions these priests preached the damnation (this being an interesting invention derived from the counterpart of bliss as a reward for being a good disciple), of anybody who was not following their teaching. Even some of those priests, now in disguise as scientists defend their beliefs with a stimulation worthy of better aims.

    And so we, common human, live from our childhood assailed by a myriad of beliefs that intend to conform us into a malleable unit of a pliable crowd. That created beliefs in all its forms

    This is a proof of a simple truth: there is no human beings who do not belief in anything, if these beings insist in stating the lack of belief, they only are saying that nothing is the core of their belief.

    And this is so because of that infinity that lodge into all beings.

    That infinity cannot be empty, it must be filled by an infinity equal to itself, even if it is "nothing", which we all know does not exist! Not since the Big Bang, supposing the Big Bang did exist.

    So we came to believe by several ways: chance, cultural characteristics, emotional pressure, loneliness, psychological needs, and a lot of other reasons that compound the complexity of our human nature.

    The final adding of all these tortuous way winding around the peak that carry us out of this "reality" is composed by a triangle that define humankind:

    We have:

    Faith, to keep us feeding our needs of the infinite.

    Hope, to maintain alive Faith and our needs for completion.

    Charity, to help each other to have both previous needs without destroying ourselves.

    Maybe all this can answer a bit of this particular complex question of all your always complex questions, Rumpunch!

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    1. Hi Untony
      Interesting approach here! You give a potted history of the various ways in which belief itself may have originated in early man.

      I do agree, there is a clear distinction between our first ancestors who would have developed their faith from the blank canvas of a naive state compared to those who were indoctrinated within the dominant religious systems of their time and place.

      I also think there is a big difference between the person who is exposed to the perplexing myriad of options on offer in a multicultural and multi-faith environment such as the UK, compared to the religious totalitarianism of, say, Iran currently.

      Lastly, I wonder, of the various influences you list, which affected you the most profoundly?

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    2. There is more ice down the water that the one we see as floe.

      Do you prefer the long or the short version.:)

      Better to make a summary:

      All and each one affected me most, and I think it is so to everybody, only we seem to "feel" more one that another.

      You know, chance made me travel, culture gave me a frame, emotion determined my reactions, loneliness brought the need, psychological needs prepared the walls of the box to contain it all, and so on with all the ways we travel into the adventure of believing!

      The corollary worth to mention is: reading all the posts answering your questions I get the evidence that we, human beings, understand "reality" by the information that reached us through five small peep-holes, (you know, our senses, some people insist they use a sixth: esp, but that is not scientifically verifiable), even so, with so little information, we believe we know enough as to define reality, and in consequence what we must believe. Humankind is incredible in its megalomania!

      Anyway, this is a matter for another discussion. :)

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    3. As always - an original slant Untony. Sounds like you're coming from a similar place as PBScott... an informed sense of not knowing. An educated and considered uncertainty.

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  7. Rum Punh Drunk, this is awesome question and very very deep because when I read this post ( I read them all) I could not come up with a specific answer. This made me feel as if I was in a religion but did not have any reason why. So all day I have been looking in my heart for an answer to your questions. This is my journey and I will try to answer each of your questions because I when I read the comments on here nobody has answered your questions. This post is deep.

    I was born with religious parents and was forced to go to church. It wasn't until I reached an age and got my own place that I searched out a religion of my own. I did it because there was something missing in my life and because of my upbringing I it it was God.

    The research I completed was by reading the bible which is the word of God. And as I read certain things it seemed to come alive within my soul and I felt it was real. Other things I did not understand but the majority of it that I understood I believe and I think that is what you call faith.

    If I wrong by believing God then I have to say I did not do other research into anything else, and I think about this now because you should really try to do more research as well to make sure you are right. But I stick to God now. I believe this is the truth for the world. Rum Punh Drunk, you do good with the blog very interesting questions all the time. L.

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    1. Anonymous
      Thanks for explaining how you came to your conclusion, and I understand that what I have asked is a hard question to answer.

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  8. I think I hedge my bets.
    I mostly believe in a universe that works according to scientific principles but with the definite possibility of weird s*** happening from time to time.

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    1. Thanks Big D. Out of interest, how did you get to the point in believing this. Was it from researching stuff about the universe, or did you study scientific principals yourself, or did something happen to you that made you believe this way?

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  9. Great post, RumPunchDrunk! I've always been in love with the sensuality of the human body and the world around me, even as a small child, so I would say my immediate experiences have been responsible for shaping my beliefs. Although I grew up Roman Catholic, I never really "bought into" the Church's beliefs and doctrines. When I read the Tao Te Ching as a young adult, it resonated with me. I guess I believe in my own intuition and the wisdom of the universe, and I try to interfere as little as possible.

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    1. Thanks Kris, very interesting that you touch on the word 'intuition'. A concept that opens up a whole new vista on this issue of where our beliefs originate from. I'd be interested if you have the time to find out a little on what you mean by this word 'intuition' and .... you guessed it, where does intuition come from?

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  10. Great topic! I feel the same way that most people don't ask such questions. I happen to be one of few who question origins of our beliefs, even of our consciousness. I don't have simple answers for why we believe what we believe, but I tend to believe that it could be one of organic functions for organisms to protect their "organic integrity" (harmony?) in order to survive, or grow stronger.

    Personally, I believe we all have right to live life, to choose what's best for us, with one condition - not to harm others.

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    1. Thanks Yun Yi for your comment. Please please tell me more, because I'm encouraged to hear that you have thought about this already, and I'm not at all sure if I understand what you mean about 'organic functions'. If you could spare the time I'd really like to hear more. I feel this whole area has the potential to become a very simulating topic.

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    2. thanks RPD for taking my point seriously. my view are completely based on my own observation, so it may not make mush common sense. and i am not sure the use of word "organism" really helped.
      i believe every type of organisms are meant to survive, human is not an exception. and human belief also are part of human life and it means to support human's survive. in order to survive, human life need to keep a harmony, which means its mental and physical conditions need to cooperate with each other. that's why we (human) tend to see the "truth" that support our beliefs, and ignore those that don't. and since it is so much easier for a person to continue his/her life positively with his existing beliefs, it's just better for him/her not to question any fundamental premises of those believed theories, otherwise, it takes too much energy to re-construct another theory to help his/her life.
      so, from this point of view, i do think, that questioning fundamental issues of our beliefs is something more about "capability" than "choice" - many people just are not capable to do such things.

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    3. Yun Yi. Thanks for explaining more in detail about your beliefs here and yes I tend to take all comments seriously. I want this blog to be a safe place for free flowing discussions / viewpoints / ideas and suggestions etc without people feeling under personal attack in any way.

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  11. I believe there is more to live than this world. I also believe in a higher power and the power of divination because I have experienced all of these first hand. Thanks for the birthday wishes =)

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    1. Thanks for your comment Bella and hope you had a really good birthday.

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  12. I'm not sure if I have any firm beliefs, per se. I do believe that there is some sort of a cosmic force that binds us, and I believe that we should treat others the way we want ourselves to be treated, but I find specific religious tenets very binding. Still, there are things I know others believe that I do not and, frankly, some of them I find hard to swallow. The subjugation of women in some cultures is one example. As to how I acquired these beliefs? I'd say my parents got the ball rolling. My education, the culture I've brought up in, as well as books and conversations with others have also contributed.

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    1. Yes, that's the 'golden rule' - 'do unto others as you would have them do unto you'. The universal law. Stay with that and you won't go too wrong. Problem is, it's simple to understand but tough and sometimes complicated to apply.

      It's also hard trying to continue to believe in something that either causes harm to others or degrades one another in the name of religion. Thanks Janene.

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  13. Wow! You're making my brain work on Sunday. It's going to ask for overtime. Regardless, I'll take the monetary hit. I believe in fate and a higher power. I'm just not sure what the higher power is. But I believe there is so much that we do not know and for that reason, cannot arbitrarily discount beliefs out of ignorance. I'm a spiritual person and consider myself an optimist. I can't tell you specifically what prompted my beliefs. I think they matured with age like a fine wine.

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    1. Lauren, I think that's a common problem for 'man' in general, not always knowing everything that we want to know because we insist on trying to process it logically.

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  14. I'm a strongly spiritual person who 'believes' that I am strongly connected on the Other Side, that a world exists there by love - love that we cannot understand in mortal form.
    As to your post, it was excellent. I don't know what's so hard about people believing what they want if it gives them a better life, or why some people join certain groups just to be rebellious.

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    1. Donna. It seems like you're in touch with the reasons behind your choice of beliefs. As for understanding the beliefs of others, that is a whole different ball game.
      That's why I'm finding this discussion so fascinating.

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  15. I actual went out and searched the most common beliefs myself when I was younger, I have read the Quran, Bible, Buddhist books, and even some Hindu scriptures, I have spent hours in their temples, and found the more research I did into different things, the more they blended together into fantasy.

    The only beliefs I have no are based on what I can experience with my own senses, even then I question what I experience.

    I know I know nothing.

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    1. PBScott
      I'm impressed with the amount of research you have done. As far as I'm concerned it's rare. Also, knowing you "know nothing" is a good start. After so much effort, are you comfortable with that uncertainty? All the best with your journey in the future and thanks for sharing.

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    2. I am very comfortable in my reality, and am no longer searching for anything.

      I may never know what exactly is going on, if anything, but thats fine, I will just enjoy the ride.

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  16. I had written something similar to this. You can read it here:
    www.vijithforever.com/2011/11/gods-laymen-and-then-human-gods.html

    I was blindly following the beliefs and the religious thoughts of my parents. But when I started questioning it, I felt it doesn't make much sense. I have read an article by a Dr. Zakir Naik about the existence of God. I mean the beginning was good but towards the end, the guy was talking about Probability Mathematics and how The Creator himself wrote the Quran and stuffs which went right past the top of my head.

    This is what he had written: "Normally, when I meet an atheist, the first thing I like to do is to congratulate him and say, " My special congratulations to you", because most of the people who believe in God are doing blind belief - he is a Christian, because his father is a Christian; he is a Hindu, because his father is a Hindu; the majority of the people in the world are blindly following the religion of their fathers."

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    1. It's quite common for people to follow their parents religion and I guess it's sometimes because they trust their parents judgement.

      Saying that, people fail to really check out what they are following and end up in a mess later in life because they unexpectedly and abruptly realise they had spent their whole lives climbing the ladder, only to realise it was leaning against the wrong wall. Thanks for sharing here Vijith.

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  17. Nice post! Can't resist not posting a comment. Our beliefs are generally formed through our senses--our sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell. However, as a bible-reading Christian, we believe through the conviction of the Spirit that lead us to believe what we hear through preaching. But then again, that goes back to the sense of hearing because we decided to listen. Bear in mind that Christianity is so wide. There are so-called Christians who don't read the bible.

    If you believe something, you should know how to explain it in some way. Blind beliefs, as other may call it, are not beliefs at all but mere tradition of men passed unto their children. Religion for example. The bible defines religion as an act of doing certain deeds. If you help the helpless or the poor, that in itself is a religion.

    So, technically beliefs are formed through our faculties. And we have the conscience or "self" to decide on what to belief. Belief is a decision. A child couldn't decide on himself that's why we taught them. But as they grow up, they have the capability to choose what they want to believe.

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    1. Thanks for this Carly, as you put it very clearly.

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  18. For many many years I have qualified and tested my beliefs. Initially my beliefs came through family influences. Now my beliefs have been formed through searching to find truth.

    I do not believe what my parents do. But what I have been taught I think has lead me here.

    I have used history, science and archeology.

    Great topic.

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  19. Thanks Anonymous, it seems you used very tangible things to get to what you now believe.

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  20. Hey RPD, not to pimp amyone's blog here, but chatpilot's God is a Myth has a very interesting conversion story both from someone not into religion to evangical preacher to an atheist. It is a fairly long story, but very inteeresting.

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  21. Jamie, I'm more than happy for chatpilot's to share his experience's here with us all, I know who you are referring to and he does make some very very interesting reading and points, as he was an evangelical preacher and then became an atheist. Love to hear it.

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  22. Your posts always make me think. Right now I'm thinking that I guess I don't have anything specific that I'm believing in (any religion or plilosophy), I only believe in my own experiences and in things I have found out to be real through life experience.

    When I was a kid I was quite strongly "brainwashed" to believe in different things but when growing up and finding myself I found out that all of that was mostly not true and that I couldn't buy that shit anymore.

    If I have to name something I'm believing in by my experience of life would be that what you sow you'll reap. Hatrid begets hatrid. Nasty things said and done will cause you some. Being nice to someone also has it's own positive consequenses. Somehow everyone has to face the things he/she has said and done to others.

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    1. Amethyst, one thing I have always believed is that one day, everyone will have to face all the wicked things they have done to others, that thought gives me hope that they won't get away with it. Thanks for your comment.

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  23. Great discussion. I think about this stuff quite often, actually. I think you're right. We all live in our own realities.

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  24. Excellent post, Rum-Punch-Drunk and those are loaded questions! My beliefs are much more universal and inclusive than my parents’ beliefs. Their beliefs were shaped by religion, mine are not (which is why mine are able to be more universal, more accepting of the lifestyles and beliefs of others). My core beliefs deviated from my parents’ beliefs once I was free from the confines of church and parochial school, and able to explore other religions and no religion on my own. Meeting new people from different walks of life and diverse cultures has also helped to frame my belief in a basic universal acceptance of the order of things.

    I believe that all religions and beliefs are valid, whether or not I agree with them, because they are valid to the individuals believing in them. I believe there is a universal creative intelligence and order to the universe. I subscribe to the law of karma, basically that you reap what you sow in life.

    I rely on my own reason but I respect the opinions of others. Agreeing to disagree is something I will do. As far as those who claim to believe in nothing, I don’t think that’s really possible because believing in nothing is, in fact, believing in something! And I never believe by default; I have been questioning things since I was a child.

    Btw, we are having record-breaking heat waves in my area, so I probably won’t be making clam chowder anytime soon, maybe not until the fall, when I will cook up a batch of chowder and post the recipe and pictures. Just wanted you to know I won’t forget! :)

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  25. JerseyLil, it's good to know that you respect other people's religion even though you may not believe as they do, and it's good that you also have had experiences from meeting people with varying and diverse cultures, it does make a difference I think, as you are open to different views.

    As for the clam chowder, whenever I visit your blog I make sure I check that the recipe has not been missed by me, I look forward to it. In fact I can't wait. Can't wait for the hot weather to pass at your end so I can get the recipe :)

    Yes, we are hearing on the news about the big heat waves going on, so keep it cool over there. We are experiencing a rainy bout at the moment, in July! That's England for you. Thanks for commenting.

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  26. I've always thought that whether a person was religious or not had something to do with the way their brain was wired.
    My parents were religious, although they never spoke to me about it, and they sent me to a christian school. When I was a little kid I believed them when they told me about Santa, because I was a kid, and you believe whatever adults tell you when your kid. But I was absolutely convinced from the first time I heard it that they lying about god, and Jesus, and all the rest of it.
    Since I've grown up I've read the Bible, the Torah, the Quran and Buddhist and Hindu scriptures. I'm glad I did, there are some powerful stories in them, and it's nice to understand why other people live the way they do. But I never took them for anything but stories. I just don't think my brain is made to think of them any other way.
    It confuses me when people want to call the absence of belief faith. If my not believing in god is a faith so is my not believing in the tooth fairy, or that the supernatural creatures in True Blood aren't real.
    No-one can prove to me, you or anyone else that there isn't a tooth fairy, because you can't prove a negative. But we know that their isn't. That isn't faith, it's just knowledge.
    Or, in what I think is the unlikely event that I'm wrong, my not believing in god is an absence of knowledge. Like people who don't 'believe' in science. They don't have faith that there's no science. They're just wrong.

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    1. Stories. There are those that would point out, post-modernists etc, that the only way humans can understand themselves, others and the world around them is by means of stories... meta-narratives, if you will.

      So, when you say that various beliefs are also expressed in terms of 'stories' I would question whether this really invalidates them as means of conveying messages that speak to the meaning of what it means to be fully human. Science can bring us so far, no one is denying this, but if to be a human being is something beyond that which can be measured, quantified and analysed then perhaps recourse to narrative may yet be of some use. Thanks Sarah for commenting, much appreciated.

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  27. I really do, and neither I'm dat superstitious. But I surely believe dat der is some kind of power around me, which lifts me up wen I'm low, which helps me exactly wen I need help... wen m lonely. Which makes me smile in even those situations where I feel I wont be able to come back to normal for many days. I've never seen God but der is dat "something" which makes my belief more stronger every time.

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    1. So the angle that you're bringing here, is that not everyone arrives at their beliefs through a rational thought process. Sometimes it is our experiences that take the lead and our thinking is yet to catch up. Thanks for your comment Esabella.

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